Yaosang Holi in Manipur: Yaoshang is one of the major festivals of Manipur, Northeast

Yaosang Holi in Manipur: Yaoshang is one of the major festivals of Manipur, Northeast, India. committees also organise sport events This makes the holi of Manipur more energetic and unique, which also encourage youth to avoid alchol, drugs etc. And choose sports for healthy and well-being lifestyle manipurstories.com

Yaosang Holi in Manipur: Yaoshang is one of the major festivals of Manipur, Northeast

Yaosang Holi in Manipur: Yaoshang is one of the major festivals of Northeast India. Due to its similarity of the Indian festival Holi, it is often referred to as the 'Holi of Manipur'

Sports

In Manipur on Yaosang ( Holi) the clubs and committees also organise sport events "Holi Sport" where different club's sports team from all ethnic groups participates, This makes the holi of manipur more energetic and unique, which also encourage youth to avoid alchol, drugs etc. And choose sports for healthy and well-being lifestyle.

Yaosang In Manipur

Celebrated over 6 days the very name Yaosang, indicates the
agrarian origins of the festival. . Like ancient spring festivals across the world, the
Yaosang too pivots around the full moon day or ‘Lamda’ in March,
from when celebrations start
An interesting feature of this festival is the ‘Thabal Chongba’ or
dancing in the moonlight, where participants dance in circles to the
rhythmic beating of drums accompanied by folk music.

Holi in Manipur
It is interesting to note how Holi is celebrated in Manipur. Here, the festivities continue for six days starting on the full moon day of Phalguna. It may also be noted that the traditional and the centuries old Yaosang festival of Manipur amalgamated with Holi with the introduction of Vaishnavism in the eighteenth century.

Besides, there is also a tradition of preparing a thatched hut of hay, twigs and sticks and then set ablaze. The next day boys make groups and play Holi with girls. Girls, in Manipur, are smart and extract money from the boys for playing colous with them.

Holi in Temples
Devotees, dress themselves in the traditional white and yellow turbans and sing devotional songs in the Krishna temples. They also play gulal with each other in front of the temple completely submerging themselves in the mirth associated with the festival.

The Last Day
On the last day of the festival, devotees take out procession towards the main Krishna temple, 3 km west of the state capital, Imphal. Here too, devotees perform cultural activities and celebrate.

Thabal Chongba
A special Manipuri dance, called 'Thabal Chongba' is also associated with this festival. Thabal, means moonlight and Chongba means dance. Though earlier only drum or dholak, was allowed to be used for this special dance, now modern musical instruments are also used. This dance is performed on all six-days in every locality and gives a chance to the young boys and girls to meet.

Download Manipur Stories App CLICK HERE

Also Read

Why we actually celebrate it?

An ancient Hindu festival Holi, Holi heralds the arrival of spring after winter. It signifies the victory of good over evil and is celebrated as a day of spreading happiness and love. The festival is also celebrated as thanksgiving for good harvest.

The Avatar

According to Bhagvata Purana, King Hiranyakashipu--the king of demonic Asuras, who could neither be killed by a man or an animal--grew arrogant and demanded that everybody should worship him as god.

The king's son, Prahlada, disagreed and chose to remain devoted to Vishnu. Hiranyakashipu was infuriated and subjected his son to cruel punishments. Finally, Holika, the king's sister, tricked him into sitting on a pyre with her. While Holika protected herself with a cloak, Prahlada remained exposed. As the fire blazed, the cloak flew from Holika's body and encased Prahlada, thus saving his life.

Later, Vishnu appeared in the avatar of Narsimha, half man and half lion, and killed the king. This is why Holi begins with the Holika bonfire, which marks the end of evil.

According to another Avatar, Lord Krishna had developed a characteristic blue skin colour after Putana, a demon, poisoned him with her breast milk. Krishna worried if the fair-skinned Radha and her companions would ever like him because of his skin colour. Krishna's mother then asked him to approach Radha and smear her face with any colour he wanted. The playful colouring gradually evolved as a tradition and later, as a festival observed as Holi, in the Braj region of India.


CLICK HERE TO READ / BUY NOW / SEE OFFER

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0